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Purveyor House
strategic branding + creative design • bakersfield, ca
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We're in this together.

THE BUSINESS of TODDLERHOOD [volume 1]

In honor of Mother's Day, I thought I'd share a few tidbits I've learned from my toddler that have helped me in my business journey. He's a wise, old soul with a tenacity that doesn't quit

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  1. If you hear "no," ask again.
  2. Learning to walk is hard but running comes soon after.
  3. Be picky - your taste is one of a kind.
  4. Ask for help.
  5. Try your best to wake up with a smile on your face.
  6. If you do something awesome, treat yo' self.

Ok, most of those are super tongue in cheek pieces of "advice" - but stay with me here.

  1. If you hear "no," ask again.
    • I've heard this so many times as I've worked through proposals, idea pitches, the like. Keep pitching. This is not groundbreaking advice - we've heard it a million times before, every blogger, entrepreneur, what have you probably has a blog post or podcast on this. But, thinking from a toddler point-of-view can really drive it home - That thing behind the NO is all you can think about and you won't let it go. You can't, it's what drives you. Nothing else matters, so TRY AGAIN.
  2. Learning to walk is hard but running comes soon after.
    • We stumble, we fall. We cry for a while (all day, all night). We sulk. We brush it off. We get back up. We learn that it takes one foot in front of another. Slowly it starts to pay off. Then we can't do anything else but walk, so we walk faster. Then we run. 
  3. Be picky - your taste is one of a kind.
    • Toddlerhood is rough and food decisions are one of our biggest pain points. A picky toddler can turn a great morning into a crazy power play. If I'm trying to not think about this morning's episode and take something from it, it's that being picky is actually a good thing as a business owner. From who you hire, to what type of projects are right for you - being picky propels you forward and keeps you in alignment with your goals. 
  4. Ask for help.
    • Once my son could talk, I wanted him to learn how to ask for help. The whole non-verbal babyness was hard for me, I never knew what he wanted. Once he could at least point or ask for help, it became so much easier. The guessing game was over (well, almost over. try reasoning with a 2-year old that popsicles aren't on the menu for breakfast). My point is that there will always be a time where you can either go it alone and wish you had help OR you could just ask for it from the beginning. The first option leaves you open for resentment and wishes while the other builds community and relationships. Just do it, ask for help. It's not a weakness to ask for help, it's actually the strongest thing you can do.
  5. Try your best to wake up with a smile on your face.
    • Besides the few days when he's woken up with a stuffy face cold, I'm almost always greeted with a "hi mama!" and some resemblance of "good morning!" How wonderful is it to face the day with that type of optimism and happiness? I suppose adulting shapes us into skeptical and cynical folk, but if we could just start the day in a happy, centered way, I'd bet that your day goes so much smoother. When I worked out in the morning on a normal basis [i'm trying to get back, really I am] - those days were filled with energy and clarity. I loved that about working out in the morning. It was hard to get up but by the time work came around, I was ready because I had already smashed the hardest part of the day. 
  6. If you do something awesome, treat yo' self.
    • Self-explanatory. Works for toddlers & works for adults.